Expert Travel Advice to Pacific Coast

Top Answers To Pacific Coast Travel Questions

  • Anonymous user answered:
    I hope a local will answer your question; but here is my 2 cents worth as a person that is going to travel this May from Hearst Castle up Hwy 1 to Monterey and spent his Army basic training at Ft. Ord (now a college campus and high-end houses) near Monterey. One night is plenty in Monterey. If you want to stay in the area 2 nights spend one of those in Santa Cruz on the north end of Monterey Bay. Close to Santa Cruz you can see giant Redwoods -- not quite Yosemite, but nice. -- Barry Las Cruces, NM
  • Anonymous user asked:
    Anonymous user answered:
    Lots, including AirTran, British Airways, Northwest, Alaska... more info at: http://www.mspairport.com/Flight-Information/Departures.aspx
  • Anonymous user answered:
    Yes, do this trip. The Oregon coast is incredible and has a lot of campgrounds near the beach that cost $12-$15 (http://www.oregonstateparks.org/searchpark.php). When I did this five years ago, you could camp on the beach for free, which we did, but it was so windy we woke up and our tent was upside-down and buried in two feet of sand...so maybe the $12 is worth it. In northern California, the campgrounds at Redwoods National Park (http://www.nps.gov/redw/) are great and not too too busy. Good luck. Let us know how it goes!
  • Nathan answered:
    That's a broad question--around LA? You've got Channel Islands NP, which is off the coast, and then Joshua Tree to the east (but not far). Go for the former if you want aquatic environs, or head to J Tree for truly epic rock climbing, bouldering, hiking, and backpacking/climbing. To the north? Kings Canyon/Sequoia, which offers huge trees, big vistas, and really cool higher-altitude hiking. Further north? Yosemite (where I just visited), one of the country's most dramatic landscapes. Think a 3000-foot-plus-tall canyon with waterfalls gushing to the valley floor and miles of backcountry that's seldom seen by the typical tourist. Also, this year boasts the largest snowpack in recorded history, which as turned on every waterfall in the park into gushers. Of course, further east you've got Death Valley, and Grand Canyon. And I won't even start to talk about Utah. My advice? Think about what you want to do and plan from there. Each park has its advantages. But if you want to hike and backpack, I'd say hoof it up to Yosemite or Kings Canyon.

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