Expert Travel Advice to Oahu

Top Answers To Oahu Travel Questions

  • Anonymous user answered:
    As the crow flies, it's 200 miles from Oahu to the Big Island, and the only way to get there is by boat (slow) or plane (expensive). Flightseeing charters are available from Oahu, but it'll cost you upwards of $200-$300/person for the privilege. My advice, then? Budget some time to spend at least a week on the Big Island, or do Oahu this go-round and plan on hitting the Big Island for your next vacation!
  • Anonymous user answered:
    Yes jellyfish and sharks are in the water. If you go to a more monitored beach or don't swim out too far you should be okay.
  • Anonymous user answered:
    Good for you, congrats. And of course, Hawaii is a perfect pick for the big honeymoon. As you've got your airfare and hotel sorted out already, perhaps the best advice we can offer is to plan nothing and see where the romantic winds take you once you get there! If you do need some quick-hit ideas, here are a few: catch the sunrise at Waimanalo Bay Beach Park; likewise, see the sunset at Ala Moana Beach; get off crowded Waikiki and find your own slice of paradise on the island's other 100-plus miles of beaches; get active for the day with a sea-kayaking trip to Kailua, snorkeling at Hanauma Bay or Makaha Beach Park, or a hike along Oahu's scenic North Shore; indulge with a trip to one of Oahu's many top-class spas; and finally, splurge with a night (or several) on the town, including dinner at La Mer at Halekulani, which overlooks Waikiki and Diamond Head.
  • Kim answered:
    HI Kathy, Summertime, when families descend on Hawai‘i, constitutes high season. So does wintertime (from mid-December through March), when a blanket of brrrr covers most of the mainland. Holiday periods like Thanksgiving and Easter also draw throngs. Be careful about coming in late April: There are three simultaneous holidays in Japan at that time, which means the Japanese are traveling in greater numbers than usual. In general, the north and eastward facing coasts tend to get more rain. But even when it's raining on the north or eastern shore, it's often not on the south or westerly shores. And rain showers don't tend to last that long, like they do on the mainland. Check this out ==>http://www.govisithawaii.com/hawaii-weather/ And you might also want to pick up a copy of my Hawaii: An Explorer's Guide :-) ==> http://www.amazon.com/Explorers-Guide-Hawaii-Complete/dp/0881508098/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1308801035&sr=8-1 Kim Grant

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