Expert Travel Advice to Arizona

Top Answers To Arizona Travel Questions

  • Anonymous user answered:
    I'd recommend you either contact the state tourism boards for more information, or visit GORP.com's searchable campground directory at: http://campgrounds.away.com/travel/campgrounds
  • Anonymous user answered:
    When a winter chill takes over the northern states, escape to Lake Havasu State Park, AZ, where the 60- to 70-degree temperatures will make you question whether you ever want to leave. As the park's name implies, the main attraction here is Lake Havasu and its scenic shoreline that welcomes winter campers. Arizona parks are popular this time of year, but you're sure to find a nice spot along the 45-mile lakefront, sometimes called the Colorado Coast. The beaches, boats, and campground grills beg you to sit back and relax, but there's also ample opportunity to get active. Hiking trails abound, as do bass-fishing tournaments in January. The Grand Canyon is another good pick -- even though it might be snowing on the rim, drop a mile down and you'll be in desert terrain (nights will be chilly, though). Read more about hiking the Big Ditch in winter here: http://gorp.away.com/gorp/activity/hiking/features/nosnow2.htm.
  • Anonymous user answered:
    From Vegas, you pretty much have only one option for hitting the Grand Canyon because the access road to the more remote North Rim is closed for the winter. Not to worry, though, as you can still head over to the South Rim via I-40. I'd spend a night at the canyon, maybe even at the cliff-edge El Tovar if you can find rooms. Or consider hiking down the Bright Angel Trail to camp or overnight at the Bright Angel Lodge (it'll be chilly, though, this time of year). If you have only one day to hike into the canyon, then drop into the canyon on the slightly less-trafficked South Kaibab Trail to Cedar Ridge. Great hike. After the Grand Canyon, make your way south to Sedona and its beautiful red-rock canyons and mystical energy vortices. As an aside, I'd avoid the new skywalk over the Grand Canyon's west rim, as I've heard it's a bit of a mob scene that doesn't do this world wonder justice.
  • Anonymous user asked:
    Anonymous user answered:
    Sure, you can bike here, but be prepared for the worst. During winter months, the roads are often snow covered or too muddy to ride, especially after large storms. At any time of the year, the best word that can be used to describe the weather on the North Kaibab plateau is unpredictable. The wisest strategy is to come prepared for just about anything. Bring a variety of clothes to wear and always be sure to carry plenty of water. During the transition seasons you may be faced with anything from driving cold to wilting heat.

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