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Located northwest from Las Vegas this moderately strenuous trail offers users the chance to experience a scenic trail amid the ancient bristlecone pine. The bristlecone pine is the oldest living thing on earth. Some have been alive for 4000 years

At the trailhead is what may be the largest bristlecone pine in this mountain range. The bristlecone pine is the oldest living thing on earth. Some have been alive for 4000 years. Mummy Springs Trail descends through a bristlecone forest to a year-round spring. The air temperature tends to be cooler on this part of the mountain therefore the snow melts off slightly later than the North Loop section. The spring is frequented by a diversity of wildlife which thrive in the Spring Mountain Range. If approached quietly, one may encounter an eagle, deer, or maybe even a mountain lion. Quaking aspen, gooseberries, and ferns are among the many kinds of plant life found here. One of the most beautiful times to view the spring is in the autumn before the snow falls. The frozen water flows over the rock resembling draperies found in cave formations.

Directions: From Las Vegas, Travel north on U.S. Highway 95, then take State Route 157 west. Mummy Springs Trail must be accessed via the North Loop Trail. The North Loop trailhead can be reached by transferring from State Route 175 onto State Route 158 and traveling north. Drive past the road to Hilltop Campground, then park in the second turnout to the left. The Mummy Springs trail junction is about three miles in on the North Loop trail. The spring can also be accessed by hiking in from Trail Canyon about 3 and a half miles to the junction.

Elevation: 2,500 feet

Usage: Light

Difficulty: Strenuous

 
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Address:
Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada


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The details, dates, and prices mentioned here were accurate at the time of publication.

Review by Wildernet Copyright © 2010 Wildernet.com all rights reserved.

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