Aerial view of the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Michael Busselle/Digital Vision)

Route 89 to Marble Canyon near Grand Canyon, Arizona (Scott T. Baxter/Photodisc)

Hiking in the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Ken Samuelsen/Stockbyte)

Hiking in the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Alistair Wearmouth)

Grand Canyon, Arizona (Alistair Wearmouth)

Aerial view of the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Alistair Wearmouth)

Cairns in the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Alistair Wearmouth)

Grand Canyon, Arizona (Alistair Wearmouth)

Aerial view of the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Western River Expeditions/Moab Adventure Center)

Rainbow over the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Tetra Images/Getty)

Whitewater rafting in the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Ken Samuelsen/Stockbyte)

Moon over the Grand Canyon, Arizona (Robert Glusic/PhotoDisc)

Aerial view of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (NPS)

Aerial view of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (NPS)

View of Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (NPS)

Clouds and rain over the Grand Canyon, Arizona (NPS)

Toroweap Point at the Grand Canyon, Arizona (iStpckphoto/Thinkstock)

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What to do in Grand Canyon

Even stalwart atheists might have second thoughts upon their first gaze over the Grand Canyon. At 18 miles wide and a mile deep, it harbors a wild collection of geological spectacles, from statuesque cliffs and stepped canyon walls to dark gneiss chasms and narrow slots. Most of the park’s four million visitors take in the view from a South Rim overlook and call it a day. But venturing off the trodden path affords a deeper experience of the canyon’s raw magic. The rugged North Rim, open spring, summer, and fall, sees only 10 percent of the park’s total visitors and has views that are just as spectacular as the South Rim. The best strategy, however, is to venture into the inner canyon, only reachable by mule, foot, or boat. The only sign of civilization down here? The oasis of Phantom Ranch, arguably the canyon’s most memorable lodging.

Traveler Reviews of Grand Canyon


Dana rates Grand Canyon
beautiful scenary
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Alistair rates Grand Canyon
It's been said many times before, but visiting the Grand Canyon is every bit as exhilarating as its world wonder status suggests. The South Rim is definitely very busy and overrun with sightseers, so best advice is to pack some hiking boots (and water!) to hike one of the many trails into the canyon. The Bright Angel is the park's most popular and accessible route, bur for that reason does get crowded. I'd suggest catching the shuttle or walking the rim to the South Kaibab Trail, which offers stellar views and the prefect picnic spot at the Kaibab Plateau. Take your time coming up out of the canyon, and just be sure you carry enough water for the conditions (it gets hot down there -- I'm speaking from personal experience as my hiking companion got heat stroke and dehydration after we hiked down to the campground at Phantom Ranch!).
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