What to do in Amnicon Falls State Park

As part of the Tri-County Recreation Corridor that runs between Superior and Ashland, Amnicon Falls State Park is best known for the beautiful Amnicon River, a cornerstone of the park. Amnicon meaning "where the fish spawn" was named by the Ojibway Indians. With a watershed expanding 125 miles over eight counties, the Amnicon River runs 30 miles long descending 640 feet from its headwaters to Great Lake Superior. Seen from within the park, the river falls (and breaks) off more than 190 feet exposing the Douglas Fault. A wooden bridge allows visitors to look downstream to red sandstone believed to be 3,000 feet deep, while sights upstream showcasing the one billion year old basalt. The tannic acid-colored waters support the only native muskie population in this region of the state while also containing several species of trout, salmon, walleye and migrating steelhead. Birch and pine forests support a bevy of wildlife including white-tailed deer, coyotes, raccoons, foxes, porcupines, beaver, otter, and mink. Bird life embodies 130 species ranging from raptors to upland game birds.

Amnicon Falls State Park invites its visitors to come and enjoy one of the loveliest parks in Northwest Wisconsin. Here folks are welcome from the first week of May to the first weekend in October. The Amnicon River is the park's cornerstone of recreation. With the river splitting off in several directions, the park has taken full advantage of this beautiful natural resource to bring the maximum recreation value while protecting the resource.

Located along the scenic and jagged gorge, a bow-string bridge, also called a Horton bridge allows visitors to view the Douglas Fault, a geologic wonder. Designed by Charles Horton during the late 19th century, this bridge is one of five owned by the Department of Natural Resources. The Civilian Conservation Corp. added the roof in 1939. The bridge spans 55 feet over the Lower Fall allowing access to several hiking trails. Total trail distance within Amnicon Falls State Park is approximately 2 miles. The Thimbleberry Trail is an interpretive trail with an accompanying brochure detailing the plant and animal life of Amnicon Falls. A self-guided geology walk features the one billion year old natural history of the park while a short island loop provides sights and sounds of several thunderous falls. Picnic opportunities are afforded riverside under stands of pine. Amenities include restrooms, water, volleyball court, and handicapped accessible tables. There are 36 campsites at the park with both sun and birch-pine shade sites available. Amenities are primitive, however, a handicapped site is available. Camping reservations are available online or by calling a toll-free reservation number. Contact information is listed below. Fishing typically takes place below the park where the water is slower. Steelhead and walleye spawn each spring while native muskie are harvested mid-summer. A park naturalist offers varied summer programs ranging from waterfalls hikes, to geology lessons, to campfire stories. The park office provides a variety of services including distribution of park maps and park bird list, a drink machine, firewood, and souvenirs. Swimming is one of the park's most popular recreations. From rock sunbathing, to intimate excursions at Now and Again Falls, to cool dips at the base of the 30-foot waterfall, to wading in the rocky shallows, this stretch of the Amnicon River delights all ages. Diving is not permitted.

Recreation
Activities enjoyed at Amnicon Falls State Park include fishing, river swimming, rock sunbathing, wading, hiking, picnicking, camping, viewing wildlife and bird life and in winter, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, and snowshoeing. Winter activities require one to park outside entrance and walk around gate.

Location
The park is located about 10 miles east of Superior on U.S. Highway 2.

Climate
Northwest Wisconsin has four distinct seasons with warm summers and long winters. Great Lakes Michigan and Superior tend to make summers cooler and winters milder close to shore. January's average temperature is in the single digits F (-teens C). During summer, temperatures can climb to above 90 degrees F for several days (32 degrees C). Nighttime summer temperatures occasionally dip below freezing. The area's average yearly precipitation ranges from 32-34". Annual snowfalls in the Northwest Region have a wide range; the southern areas may receive 20" while the northern areas may receive in excess of 200". Dressing in layers is a good way to remain comfortable in Wisconsin.

Address
6294 S. State Road 35
Superior, WI 54880-8326

Phone: 715-398-3000

  • Amnicon Falls State Park Travel Q&A

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